The Dragon Prince Block Print Painting
After a few days of watercoloring, prismacoloring, a touch of gouache, and some stylistic experimentation, I finished coloring the Dragon Prince block print I carved recently. I will admit I did design this piece with it as a mock book-cover in mind (but it works just as well as a stand-alone).
Unfortunately photos don’t quite catch the gem-like quality I achieved, and I don’t have a scanner bed large enough to accommodate this piece (and since it’s mounted on clayboard I can’t scan it in chunks and reconfigure it on the computer cause I end up with a perpetual blurry spot in the center). Any advice in the meantime would be appreciated. 
I’ll try to get better photos and/or scans with different equipment and/or lighting soon—but the best place to see it would be at the IlluXCon Showcase in person in September. ;)

The Dragon Prince Block Print Painting

After a few days of watercoloring, prismacoloring, a touch of gouache, and some stylistic experimentation, I finished coloring the Dragon Prince block print I carved recently. I will admit I did design this piece with it as a mock book-cover in mind (but it works just as well as a stand-alone).

Unfortunately photos don’t quite catch the gem-like quality I achieved, and I don’t have a scanner bed large enough to accommodate this piece (and since it’s mounted on clayboard I can’t scan it in chunks and reconfigure it on the computer cause I end up with a perpetual blurry spot in the center). Any advice in the meantime would be appreciated.

I’ll try to get better photos and/or scans with different equipment and/or lighting soon—but the best place to see it would be at the IlluXCon Showcase in person in September. ;)

200 Follower Givaway

In the blink of an eye I surpassed 200 followers!

You know that means?

GIVAWAY!!!

Thank you all so much for the like, reblogs, and support.

The Rules:

1.      Please do not remove this caption/text

2.      Since this is givaway celebrating 200 followers, please be following the Painting Dragon Feathers blog! Don’t be shy, click the follow button for art, stories, and critters!

3.      Please, ONE (1) REBLOG and ONE (1) LIKE PER BLOG. This will give you the opportunity to be entered twice (2 times).

4.      Entering blogs must have a means of contact—either an open ask box or an email address listed on their blog. Selected winners will be contacted for a physical mailing address. If the contacted winners do not respond within one (1) week of initial contact, then a new winner for that prize will be selected.

5.      Once you are contacted, please respond to me at my email, JDArtist@hotmail.com with your address/commission details. Tumblr likes to eat my asks, so just to be safe email me please.

6.      If you win the First Prize: One (1) 6”x8” Relief Print Commission, please note I WILL NOT draw: porn, excessive gore, or copyrighted characters. HOWEVER, OC’s and PG-13 romance/violence are fair game.

7.      This givaway is open until September 1st, 2014. On September 2nd, I will select the winners using a true random number generator and contact them.

8.      If you have any questions or comments regarding this givaway (or anything, really), feel free to drop an ask in my box or email me at JDArtist@hotmail.com

Again, thank you all so much for the interest and support in my art. I hope to continue writing and printing dragon princes, mischievous fey, and strange sea monsters for many years to come.

—J.D. Donnelly

Courting a Goddess
This was a block print I carved several months ago, but it didn’t quite work as a stand-alone print. However, I recently worked on resolving it as a colored painting with pleasing results. 
The legend depicted here is the premise of a Japanese legend, but has roots in Indian Hinduism. Basically, there is this goddess, either named Benten or Benzaiten in Japanese Buddhism, who is an East-Asian interpretation of the Hindu goddess Saraswati. She is the goddess of the sea, good luck, beauty,poetry, music, etc. In some versions of her mythology, Benzaiten is the daughter of a dragon herself, her number of arms is between 2 and 8 (I went with 4 in this illustration), and she is usually depicted playing a Japanese lute called a biwa. 
So long ago there was this particular dragon. He was being a carnivorous jerk and eating a lot of people, especially children, along the seaside villages (cause in Japanese folklore dragons often reside in and are associated with the sea).
When Benzaiten heard of this dragon’s reckless behavior, she descended on a cloud to confront him. Apparently her descent from the heavens was so awesome she caused earthquakes and a whole new island—Enoshima—to erupt from the sea (this island is still sacred to her to this day).
When the dragon laid eyed on the goddess, he was instantly in love. He wooed her and courted her, and she finally agreed to marry him—if he took humans off the menu. The dragon readily agreed, never ate another human, and they lived happily ever after. :D
I looked to both Indian and Japanese imagery for this particular illustration—I gave Benzaiten the Indian complexion and many arms of her Hindu ancestry, but clothed her with a celestial robe (if you see a thin scarf-like cloth around a female figure in Chinese/Japanese art, it’s kindof the equivalent of a halo and connotes divinity). The dragon is offering her a giant pearl, which East-Asian dragons are often depicted with as a celestial treasure, but his head is based on the Ganges river crocodile. His coloring is based on a lion fish.

Courting a Goddess

This was a block print I carved several months ago, but it didn’t quite work as a stand-alone print. However, I recently worked on resolving it as a colored painting with pleasing results.

The legend depicted here is the premise of a Japanese legend, but has roots in Indian Hinduism. Basically, there is this goddess, either named Benten or Benzaiten in Japanese Buddhism, who is an East-Asian interpretation of the Hindu goddess Saraswati. She is the goddess of the sea, good luck, beauty,poetry, music, etc. In some versions of her mythology, Benzaiten is the daughter of a dragon herself, her number of arms is between 2 and 8 (I went with 4 in this illustration), and she is usually depicted playing a Japanese lute called a biwa

So long ago there was this particular dragon. He was being a carnivorous jerk and eating a lot of people, especially children, along the seaside villages (cause in Japanese folklore dragons often reside in and are associated with the sea).

When Benzaiten heard of this dragon’s reckless behavior, she descended on a cloud to confront him. Apparently her descent from the heavens was so awesome she caused earthquakes and a whole new island—Enoshima—to erupt from the sea (this island is still sacred to her to this day).

When the dragon laid eyed on the goddess, he was instantly in love. He wooed her and courted her, and she finally agreed to marry him—if he took humans off the menu. The dragon readily agreed, never ate another human, and they lived happily ever after. :D

I looked to both Indian and Japanese imagery for this particular illustration—I gave Benzaiten the Indian complexion and many arms of her Hindu ancestry, but clothed her with a celestial robe (if you see a thin scarf-like cloth around a female figure in Chinese/Japanese art, it’s kindof the equivalent of a halo and connotes divinity). The dragon is offering her a giant pearl, which East-Asian dragons are often depicted with as a celestial treasure, but his head is based on the Ganges river crocodile. His coloring is based on a lion fish.

Velveteen Rabbit Bookmark Block Print
My SCBWI chapter is holding a bookmark contest for the upcoming regional conference, and the chosen theme is the classic children’s story, The Velveteen Rabbit. The gist is a stuffed animal rabbit wants to become a real rabbit, and at the end of the story his wish is granted by a fairy (hence the image on the bookmark).
I’ve mounted a print on clayboard to prepare for watercoloring, and I plan on submitting a colored version as my entry in the contest

Velveteen Rabbit Bookmark Block Print

My SCBWI chapter is holding a bookmark contest for the upcoming regional conference, and the chosen theme is the classic children’s story, The Velveteen Rabbit. The gist is a stuffed animal rabbit wants to become a real rabbit, and at the end of the story his wish is granted by a fairy (hence the image on the bookmark).

I’ve mounted a print on clayboard to prepare for watercoloring, and I plan on submitting a colored version as my entry in the contest

Dragon Prince Block Print
Surprisingly in my year of block printing since graduation, I have not carved a Dragon Prince image. I needed to remedy this. 
I made this image with the idea of contrasting negative vs. positive space and rendered vs. unrendered. I also aimed for a more stylized approach than what I normally do, but with my usual border design (the circle-dot-line designs I commonly use I developed as the magical symbols in Dragon Prince, actually).
It’s also my intended goal that this particular block print will be the base of a painting, and I’ve already done some color tests. Stay tuned!
Though partially covered, the array design in the far back of the image is the array that transforms Jaji from a dragon prince to a human boy.

Dragon Prince Block Print

Surprisingly in my year of block printing since graduation, I have not carved a Dragon Prince image. I needed to remedy this.

I made this image with the idea of contrasting negative vs. positive space and rendered vs. unrendered. I also aimed for a more stylized approach than what I normally do, but with my usual border design (the circle-dot-line designs I commonly use I developed as the magical symbols in Dragon Prince, actually).

It’s also my intended goal that this particular block print will be the base of a painting, and I’ve already done some color tests. Stay tuned!

Though partially covered, the array design in the far back of the image is the array that transforms Jaji from a dragon prince to a human boy.

Tengu Watercolored Print
Print Version
Draft Version
Broke out the watercolors again and tackled the Tengu print I had carved. I also tried a new spray adhesive to mount the paper onto clayboard (since I print on charcoal paper, which isn’t watercolor friendly). The spray adhesive initially adhered beautifully flat, but it warped as I watercolored it. The other stuff I was using warped while drying, but didn’t warp further while I watercolored. Either way, looks like I’ll need to tinker/practice more with materials to get a warp-free watercolor.

Tengu Watercolored Print

Print Version

Draft Version

Broke out the watercolors again and tackled the Tengu print I had carved. I also tried a new spray adhesive to mount the paper onto clayboard (since I print on charcoal paper, which isn’t watercolor friendly). The spray adhesive initially adhered beautifully flat, but it warped as I watercolored it. The other stuff I was using warped while drying, but didn’t warp further while I watercolored. Either way, looks like I’ll need to tinker/practice more with materials to get a warp-free watercolor.

Godfather Death Block Print
I haven’t disappeared, I swear, I’ve just been busy carving!
I also went away for the month to hang out with and help out my mentors at the Hollins Children’s Literature and Illustration graduate program. I learned alot of neat things and got to meet some cool people, like author/illustrators Eric Rohmann and Judy Schachner.
I finished carving this piece while away and was able to take advantage of an actual printing press to print an edition of this 12” x 12” clear-cut linoleum plate.
This is my submission to a printmaking contest that Dick Blick is hosting in conjunction with Richeson Co. This block print was carved in the latter company’s Clear Carve Linoleum.
Onward to more printmaking with the new things I learned—I want to carve a few more elaborate pieces before Illuxcon in September. :D

Godfather Death Block Print

I haven’t disappeared, I swear, I’ve just been busy carving!

I also went away for the month to hang out with and help out my mentors at the Hollins Children’s Literature and Illustration graduate program. I learned alot of neat things and got to meet some cool people, like author/illustrators Eric Rohmann and Judy Schachner.

I finished carving this piece while away and was able to take advantage of an actual printing press to print an edition of this 12” x 12” clear-cut linoleum plate.

This is my submission to a printmaking contest that Dick Blick is hosting in conjunction with Richeson Co. This block print was carved in the latter company’s Clear Carve Linoleum.

Onward to more printmaking with the new things I learned—I want to carve a few more elaborate pieces before Illuxcon in September. :D

Artist Alley Debut
This past weekend I set up shop at my first Artist Alley ever at a local convention, SciFi Valley. It was alot of fun and a good learning experience—everyone, attendees and other vendors, were really nice, supportive, and helpful. I even brought some blocks with me and offered them as “print-on-demand” options, which I printed right then and there in printing demonstrations. 
By far the most popular image was "Release the Quacken!", and the original painting for "Under the Lilies" found a nice home. 
I’ve added a new page to my tumblr listing my scheduled convention/show dates, which will be updated as I sign up for more cons.

Artist Alley Debut

This past weekend I set up shop at my first Artist Alley ever at a local convention, SciFi Valley. It was alot of fun and a good learning experience—everyone, attendees and other vendors, were really nice, supportive, and helpful. I even brought some blocks with me and offered them as “print-on-demand” options, which I printed right then and there in printing demonstrations.

By far the most popular image was "Release the Quacken!", and the original painting for "Under the Lilies" found a nice home.

I’ve added a new page to my tumblr listing my scheduled convention/show dates, which will be updated as I sign up for more cons.

Traces of Specters
Sorry the art has been slow lately—I’ve been traveling, doing prepwork for my first con artist alley booth, and the block print I was previously working on did not turn out as I had liked. :( But, as proof that I am still busy carving, here’s a traced draft of an upcoming print I’m carving into clear-cut linoleum, an illustration of the Brothers’ Grimm fairytale “Godfather Death.” At 12” x 12”, this is the largest print I’ve attempted to date—here’s hoping the final print lives up to this lineart.
It took awhile just to trace it in pencil—now I gotta trace it about two more times, color some thumbnails to figure out how to render it, and actually carve it. An artist is rarely idle, even when quiet on the internet.

Traces of Specters

Sorry the art has been slow lately—I’ve been traveling, doing prepwork for my first con artist alley booth, and the block print I was previously working on did not turn out as I had liked. :( But, as proof that I am still busy carving, here’s a traced draft of an upcoming print I’m carving into clear-cut linoleum, an illustration of the Brothers’ Grimm fairytale “Godfather Death.” At 12” x 12”, this is the largest print I’ve attempted to date—here’s hoping the final print lives up to this lineart.

It took awhile just to trace it in pencil—now I gotta trace it about two more times, color some thumbnails to figure out how to render it, and actually carve it. An artist is rarely idle, even when quiet on the internet.

Dubbing the Spoon
Today, after hand-printing more of my St. Martha and the Tarasque prints, which is by far the most strenuous to print by hand (so far), I have decided my trusty wooden printing spoon has earned its name. May Pawprinter serve me for many years to come. 
(I also figured marking it/naming it would make it less likely to walk off in group/convention settings)

Dubbing the Spoon

Today, after hand-printing more of my St. Martha and the Tarasque prints, which is by far the most strenuous to print by hand (so far), I have decided my trusty wooden printing spoon has earned its name. May Pawprinter serve me for many years to come.

(I also figured marking it/naming it would make it less likely to walk off in group/convention settings)